Part 2: KPCSC wants Russia to help end impasse on new definition of conflict diamonds

In the first installment of this two-part exclusive interview with Shamiso Mtisi, the coordinator of the Kimberley Process Civil Society Coalition (KPCSC), we focused on illegal diamond mining in the continent and where the contraband ends up...

25 october 2021

Part 1: KPCSC gives insight into illegal diamond mining, trading in Africa

Although the diamond watchdog Kimberley Process (KP) prides itself for significantly reducing the flow of conflict goods since its establishment in 2003, the Kimberley Process Civil Society Coalition (KPCSC) alleged that illegal diamond...

18 october 2021

The jewelry industry in Russia needs to be upgraded in a serious way

Dina Nasyrova is a vice-president of the International Jewelry Exhibition-Congress J-1 recently hosted by the Atrium of Gostiny Dvor in Moscow. As a partner and the Muse of the famous jeweler Ilgiz Fazulzyanov, she actively participated in the preparation...

11 october 2021

Smiling Rocks, a philanthropic business model, inspires companies to work for betterment of the world

Zulu Ghevriya, the CEO and Co-Founder of Smiling Rocks, Founder of Vedantti Jewellery and Managing Director of Prism Group has been in the diamond and jewellery industry for over 20 years. Zulu started his business, Prism Group, as a natural diamond...

04 october 2021

Work hard and you will find success

Eduard Utkin, Director General of the “Jewellers’ Guild of Russia” Association, expert of the RF Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s Committee on Precious Metals and Precious Stones, told R&P about implementing the SIIS PMPS (State Integrated Information...

27 september 2021

New RJC standard for lab-grown materials

27 september 2021
Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC), the world’s leading standard-setting organisation for the global jewellery and watch industry with 1,500 member companies in 71 countries, announced that it will develop a standard for laboratory-grown materials (LGMs) to establish best practice, including the requirement for full disclosure, for such materials when used in jewellery products.
The RJC LGM standard will include laboratory-grown stones and will be separate from the RJC Code of Practices in recognition that laboratory-grown products carry a different risk profile from natural products. The standard will be available for companies dealing in LGMs.
To ensure that the new standard receives the most robust review before it is finalised, the RJC will follow its respected and well-established transparent public consultation procedure with all stakeholders, following the ISEAL Standard-Setting Code of Good Practice. The consultation process will be managed by RJC’s multi-stakeholder Standards Committee. 
Iris Van der Veken, Executive Director of RJC, said: “Setting a standard for LGMs is an important strategic initiative by RJC, underlining our commitment to ensure that all jewellery is responsibly sourced, manufactured and marketed. It is all about consumer confidence. This standard will provide a clear robust framework not only for manufacturers and retailers, but also for reassuring customers that the manufacturers and sellers of LGMs follow rigorous processes that ensure the credibility and transparency of their operations.”
David Bouffard, Chair of RJC, said: “RJC was founded to promote global best practices for the jewellery and watch industry. With the increasing consumer awareness of LGMs, it is imperative that we set these standards to ensure that all laboratory-grown diamonds and gemstones are responsibly manufactured, sourced and sold, and that consumer confidence can be maintained through the application of a clear and consistent approach for businesses dealing with LGMs. As a global standards organization for the industry, we are driving the new initiative through a transparent process with all stakeholders to develop the framework.”

Alex Shishlo for Rough&Polished