Unifying role is the main objective of the National Gemological Association

Yuri Shelementiev runs the Gemological Centre (GC) at the Moscow State University and is a president of the National Gemological Association (NGA) uniting the gemologists of Russia. The head of the MSU’ GC and the NGA answered the R&P’s...

Yesterday

“Our goal is to bring clarity to the offering of Lab Grown Diamonds”, asserts Chris Casey, President, Lab Grown Diamond Council

Chris Casey is a 15-year veteran of the diamond and jewelry industry.  Chris also has extensive experience in market research as Founding Managing Director of the NPD Diamond and Diamond Jewelry Service where his responsibility included the...

08 july 2019

Dr. Michael S. Krzemnicki: Our dedication to scientific research is an important foundation to our expertise

Dr. Michael S. Krzemnicki, PhD, Director of the Swiss Gemmological Institute SSEF, in an interview with R&P told about the activities and plans of one of the world's leading Gemological laboratories specializing in scientific research of diamonds...

01 july 2019

“Lab-Grown Diamonds is probably the biggest scam this industry has ever seen,”: Leibish Polnauer, Founder-President, Leibish & Co.

An interesting story from the Leibish & Co takes you way back to the year 1979 when young Leibish Polnauer, then a diamond polisher, was travelling to London, having just found out that the factory at which he worked had been shut down. He found an advertisement...

24 june 2019

Botswana mining industry players speak on speculative exploration licences

Speculative mineral exploration licences was a recurring theme from presentations made by three players in Botswana mining industry at a conference convened in Gaborone. The country has issued thousands of exploration licences, across the mining industry...

17 june 2019

FCRF: Fancy color prices will rise as supply wanes

22 february 2019

One of the most overlooked facts concerning the diamond industry is that the world’s diamond mines are rapidly depleting. Within a quarter of a century the majority of the 45 most notable diamond mines operating today will cease to exist, and the last diamond will be unearthed in 60 years, says a new research published by the Fancy Color Research Foundation (FCRF).

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      Image credit: FRCF 


According to FCRF, diamond prices will rise as supply wanes. Fancy Color diamonds, considered to be the rarest of the rare, will increase in value at an even greater pace. The report states that no new ‘mega-mine’ is expected to be found in the foreseeable future. On the other hand, the world’s wealthy population is expected to continue to grow at a rapid pace and demand for diamonds is expected to rise.
The result, according to the FCRF, is that the diamond industry will change beyond recognition. Manufacturing and related technology will slowly disappear. The “second-hand” diamond market will flourish. According to FCRF, the report should be an eye opener for diamond buyers and investors: “There is no reason why diamond buyers or anyone with long-term vision can’t start realizing an extra premium from this scarcity right now,” the report states.

Aruna Gaitonde, Editor-in-Chief of the Asian Bureau, Rough & Polished