Vladimir Zboykov: New times have come for jewelers

How a personal collection of minerals was thrown on the scrap-heap, who is behind the destruction of gemstone consumption culture in Russia and why jewelers will soon have to choose between business and prison – all this was told to Rough & Polished...

Yesterday

Changing preconceptions in the diamond and financial markets

Eli Avidar is a man on the move…literally. In April, the former Israeli diplomat stepped away from the CEO’s office at the Israel Diamond Exchange, a position he had held for more than two years, and from the Israel Diamond Institute, where he had been...

13 august 2018

Chasing a dream…

Elina Chan, MD of Shenzhen Shi Qing Yu Zhubao Ltd completed her higher education from Xiamen University and Master’s degree from Hong Kong University. To achieve her dream to start a business, Elina gave up numerous job opportunities in Hong Kong and...

06 august 2018

Pangolin Diamonds using termites to find kimberlite indicators in Botswana

It is not a secret that the rate of kimberlite discovery in Botswana has dropped considerably and research has shown that termites can help diamond explorers have an understanding of the transport mechanism of kimberlite indicator minerals from the kimberlite...

30 july 2018

In another fifty years, we’ll have a different scale of valuation, and all those items of natural origin – including diamonds – will sharply increase in price

Within the framework of the Qatar-Russia 2018 Year of Culture, the World Diamond Museum hosts an exhibition of the Qatar Museums at the State Historical Museum in Moscow – "Pearls: Treasures of the Seas and the Rivers," that opened on 11 July...

24 july 2018

WFDB Responds to Revised Federal Trade Commission Guidelines

30 july 2018
The World Federation of Diamond Bourses (WFDB) has responded to the revised U.S. Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) guidelines released this week as they relate to the issue of descriptors for diamonds. The new guidelines are not in line with the Diamond Terminology Guidelines as agreed last year and implemented by the WFDB, the International Diamond Council, the International Diamond Manufacturers Association and CIBJO, the World Jewellery Confederation, said WFDB President Ernie Blom. However, he pointed out that the new guides do require that all lab-grown diamonds must be clearly and conspicuously disclosed.

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Image redit: WFDB


"We have a united stand regarding nomenclature which was agreed with all the combined knowledge and experience of the leading industry bodies, but the FTC appears to have moved in a different direction," Blom said.
Previously, the FTC's guidelines approved non-mined diamonds: laboratory-created, laboratory-grown, [manufacturer-name]-created, and synthetic as descriptors, and while the first three remain, it has removed the term synthetic. "We feel that these changes provide too much of a bias towards the lab-grown diamond sector," said Blom. "We appreciate the hard work of the FTC, but we do not feel that the views of the diamond sector were taken sufficiently into account, though we acknowledge there was consultation with American industry bodies. The guidelines do not include the views of the global diamond trade which the WFDB represents, although we are pleased that lab-grown stones have to be clearly marked as such. 
"Our paramount aim is always consumer confidence and the revision has the potential to cause a degree of confusion. The FTC notes that manufacturers that make diamonds in a factory setting are free to use other descriptors as long as they 'clearly and conspicuously convey that the product is not a mined stone,' but we feel that this might provide too much latitude in their marketing claims.
"We appreciate that the FTC rejected a bid by diamond growers to include terms such as [manufacturer-name]-grown, foundry, created, and grown. These are stones created to order in a factory. We are also pleased that the FTC makes clear that any descriptors for non-mined diamonds must be absolutely clear and prominently displayed to consumers. A diamond sold without any descriptors must be a natural diamond. 
"We hope that the door is still open for us to go back and approach the FTC in order to try and persuade the organization to re-think its decision," Blom added.