The talk around LGDs is all hype

As a teenager, Luca Luterbacher began to design and manufacture single pieces and individual items for wealthy private family friends from Switzerland and Lichtenstein. In 2017, he finally invested in his own luxury trademark "Luterbacher."...

12 august 2019

Correct adjustment of advertising is the major challenge

At the recent Amberforum held in the Baltic city of Svetlogorsk, Andrey Yanchevsky, Head of the trade representation of the LA VIVION jewelery company shared his opinion with the correspondent of Rough&Polished on the state and prospects of the jewellery...

05 august 2019

Small-scale diamond mining is the future in Botswana – Leon Daniels

Pangolin Diamonds, which is currently the most active diamond exploration company in Botswana, has called upon authorities in the southern African country to include diamonds into the minerals permit for small scale mining operations. Pangolin chief...

29 july 2019

“There has been a strict policy in Israel against LGDs; have been forbidden on IDE trading floor for years.”: Aviel Elia, Managing Director- IDI

Aviel Elia, an attorney by profession, has served as Legal Adviser and Company Secretary of IDI since 2013. As a key member of the Israel Diamond Institute (IDI) management team, he has been involved in developing company strategy and negotiating...

22 july 2019

Unifying role is the main objective of the National Gemological Association

Yuri Shelementiev runs the Gemological Centre (GC) at the Moscow State University and is a president of the National Gemological Association (NGA) uniting the gemologists of Russia. The head of the MSU’ GC and the NGA answered the R&P’s...

15 july 2019

Lab-grown stones are also diamonds - FTC

27 july 2018
According to RAPAPORT, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) broadened its definition of “diamond” as it had amended its jewelry guidelines. Now the notion of “lab-grown diamond” is also referred to as a “diamond”.
As of FTC, before the diamond was defined as a natural mineral, but today such a definition is no longer relevant as lab-grown stones are considered diamonds as well, inspite of not being unearthed.

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Image credit: De Beers


“When the commission first used this definition in 1956, there was only one type of diamond product on the market — natural stones mined from the earth,” the FTC said. “Since then, technological advances have made it possible to create diamonds in a laboratory. These stones have essentially the same optical, physical and chemical properties as mined diamonds. Thus, they are diamonds.”
According to the report, it is also necessary to define the notion of “cultured”, when describing the origin of lab-grown diamonds. FTC suggests using such words as “man-made,” “lab-grown” or “foundry.”
The commission believes that the word “synthetic”, which is frequently used to describe lab-grown stones, evokes negative associations among consumers. They think that such term qualifies the stones as fake and artificial, which is why FTC recommends to avoid using it.
The agency also noted that the Diamond Producers Association (DPA) intends to better address the jewelry guidelines before commenting on this subject.

Victoria Quri, Rough&Polished