De Beers’ GemFair delivering ‘positive impacts’ to ASM sector in Sierra Leone – David Johnson

GemFair, a pilot project developed by De Beers to create a secure and transparent route to market ethically sourced artisanal and small-scale mined (ASM) diamonds, is already delivering “important positive impacts” in Sierra Leone. Group head...

11 november 2019

Belgian-quality diamond boiling in Dubai from TRIGEM

Born in New York, David Zabinsky is CEO & Co-Founder of TRIGEM, an independent diamond service provider in Dubai. Before TRIGEM, David was Manager at Ras Al Khaimah Economic Zone, where he was responsible for securing North and South American investment...

05 november 2019

Pavel Shelkov: "Our project is an attempt to fit Russia into the global trend and create a new private company in the diamond industry"

At the end of September, Moscow hosted the Second Annual Conference, "Gold and Diamond Mining Companies of Russia and Europe." The audience showed great interest to the presentation made by diamond geologist Pavel Shelkov of Almazy Zapolyarya...

28 october 2019

The team that turns sleeping stones into beautiful polished diamonds

Maxim Zemlyakov is the Director General of ADMS OOO, a company cutting and polishing natural and synthetic diamonds in Oryol. He has been the Director General of Oryol-ALROSA since 2007. Before heading it, he worked as a grinder, cutter, instructor...

21 october 2019

Demand will pick up once the season starts

N Anantha Padmanaban took charge as the Chairman of the All India Gem & Jewellery Domestic Council (GJC) in January 2019. He has immense hopes and confidence in the Indian jewellery sector. His motto is to ‘ensure that after the day’s business...

14 october 2019

Namdia targets foreign diamond markets

30 march 2018
Namib Desert Diamonds (Namdia) said it will export its annual 15 percent entitlement of diamonds produced by Namdeb Holdings in line with the marketing and sales agreement signed between Namibia and De Beers in 2016.
Under the sales agreement the Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) sells the country’s rough stones, on behalf of Namdeb Holdings, to De Beers for its 85 percent entitlement and the rest to Namdia.
De Beers in turn sells part of its entitlement to sightholders in Namibia and takes the remainder to Gaborone for aggregation.
“Our 15 percent, or a minimum of $150 million, was earmarked for international sales and not for the local market,” company chief executive Kennedy Hamutenya was quoted as saying by a local newspaper, New Era.
“This was a deliberate policy decision by the government in order to make inroads into the international market and reduce our reliance on the middleman in selling our stones. This was done to give us better insights into this very secretive and opaque industry.”
He said Namdia does not deal in or handle diamonds mixed with those of other producing nations.
“When a client is buying Namdia diamonds they can be guaranteed that they are buying a 100 percent Namibian-mined diamond,” said Hamutenya.
“This is particularly important for those clients who want to give assurance to their end user client that they know the source of the diamond – that it was not involved in child labour, that it is not tainted as a conflict or blood diamond and that it has no links with money laundering or financing of terrorism.”

Mathew Nyaungwa, Editor in Chief of the African Bureau, Rough&Polished