“With technology all information is immutable and Blockchain cannot be compromised,” reassures Erik Jens, CEO, LuxuryFintech

When Erik A Jens quit ABN AMRO as global CEO of its diamond and jewellery client division, he started his movement called LuxuryFintech, which provides services such as commercial and corporate banking solutions for the art and jewelry sector, and asset-backed...

25 january 2021

Diamonds across time

Not so long ago, the global library of professional publications on precious stones was replenished with a unique book about rare diamonds and diamond jewelry published by the World Diamond Museum. Alex Popov, the founder and director of the museum told...

18 january 2021

Academician Pokhilenko: The situation with rough diamonds in the Russian Federation will start changing for the worse as early as 2025

Nikolai Petrovich Pokhilenko, Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Deputy Chairman of the Siberian Branch (SB) of the RAS, Scientific Director of the Institute of Geology and Mineralogy of the SB of the RAS, is a prominent...

11 january 2021

Ilgiz Fazulzyanov: For a creator, the quarantine is the time to work on future masterpieces

Ilgiz Fazulzyanov is a successful and internationally recognized jewellery designer. He received his academic art education in Kazan and moved to Moscow in the 1990s where he lives and works now. His brand, Ilgiz F., is well known among true connoisseurs...

04 january 2021

Botswana Diamonds keen to mine KX36 kimberlite if found commercial

Botswana Diamonds intends to mine the KX36 kimberlite, which it recently acquired from Petra Diamonds if found commercial. The high-grade KX36 kimberlite pipe is part of the three Prospecting Licenses in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in Botswana...

28 december 2020

Namdia targets foreign diamond markets

30 march 2018
Namib Desert Diamonds (Namdia) said it will export its annual 15 percent entitlement of diamonds produced by Namdeb Holdings in line with the marketing and sales agreement signed between Namibia and De Beers in 2016.
Under the sales agreement the Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) sells the country’s rough stones, on behalf of Namdeb Holdings, to De Beers for its 85 percent entitlement and the rest to Namdia.
De Beers in turn sells part of its entitlement to sightholders in Namibia and takes the remainder to Gaborone for aggregation.
“Our 15 percent, or a minimum of $150 million, was earmarked for international sales and not for the local market,” company chief executive Kennedy Hamutenya was quoted as saying by a local newspaper, New Era.
“This was a deliberate policy decision by the government in order to make inroads into the international market and reduce our reliance on the middleman in selling our stones. This was done to give us better insights into this very secretive and opaque industry.”
He said Namdia does not deal in or handle diamonds mixed with those of other producing nations.
“When a client is buying Namdia diamonds they can be guaranteed that they are buying a 100 percent Namibian-mined diamond,” said Hamutenya.
“This is particularly important for those clients who want to give assurance to their end user client that they know the source of the diamond – that it was not involved in child labour, that it is not tainted as a conflict or blood diamond and that it has no links with money laundering or financing of terrorism.”

Mathew Nyaungwa, Editor in Chief of the African Bureau, Rough&Polished