ALROSA sells large rough diamonds in Vladivostok for $12.6 mln

ALROSA, the world's largest diamond mining company, has sold special size rough diamonds (over 10.8 carats) at the auction in Vladivostok.

21 september 2018

CTF and GIA launch digital grading reports using blockchain technology

Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group and GIA (Gemological Institute of America), formally launched a collaboration project in Hong Kong to use blockchain technology for delivering secure, digital diamond grading reports to consumers for the first time...

21 september 2018

BlueRock narrows H1 losses as grades improve at Kareevlei

BlueRock Diamonds reduced its loss for the first half of the year to £789,000 from a £1.3 million loss, a year earlier as average grades and production improved at its Kareevlei mine in South Africa.

21 september 2018

Zim says diamond policy ‘imminent’

BlueRock Diamonds reduced its loss for the first half of the year to £789,000 from a £1.3 million loss, a year earlier as average grades and production improved at its Kareevlei mine in South Africa.

21 september 2018

AGD DIAMONDS enters international diamond market

JSC Arkhangelskgeoldobycha was officially renamed into JSC AGD DIAMONDS, according to the company’s press statement distributed on Wednesday. The change in the corporate name of the joint-stock company was due to its new marketing policy and the brand’s...

20 september 2018

Chinese and Indian Consumers Want Different Things From Luxury

12 march 2018
(Jing Daily) - “The world is changing, the economy is changing, the geography of luxury is changing,” said François Le Troquer in 2012, back when he was managing director of Cartier UK. The comment came at the official launch of a Cartier short film in which the Cartier panther travels across China and India, big developing economies whose luxury markets have since evolved in different directions. India and China opened their doors to foreign retail in the late 20th century and both countries slapped a high import duty and tax on luxury goods, making the products much costlier to buy domestically.  While in the last three decades, Chinese luxury sales have risen to occupy the number one spot worldwide at 32 percent, India lags behind, one of the last big frontiers with vastly untapped potential for luxury consumption. Currently just seven percent of the Chinese luxury market, the Indian luxury market is growing at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 25 percent. The country has added around 500 new ultra high-net-worth individuals (those with investable assets of at least $30 million excluding personal assets and personal property) annually over the past decade, and over the next decade that number will double to approximately 1,000 per year. Undoubtedly both countries’ luxury markets and broader economies are at different stages, contributing to different perceptions and attitudes towards luxury. Here are four key differences.