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15.12.2014
Demand for diamonds in the world is very high – AWDC
margaux_donckier_preview.jpgMargaux Donckier, spokesperson of the Antwerp World Diamond Center, told about the main trends in the diamond market in her interview to Rough&Polished.

08.12.2014
Our goal is to create a think tank, which will come up with ideas how to reach outside our closed circuit and bring people the message about diamonds, tell why they should buy them
alex_popov_x.jpgThe World Diamond Mark® Foundation (WDMF) in a non-for-profit organization founded in 2012 by the World Federation of Diamond Bourses whose goal is to increase consumer demand for diamonds and enhance the trust in them. To reach this goal, the WDMF is engaged in generic marketing programmes, raises public awareness of diamonds, educates retailers and conducts attestation of the Authorised Diamond Dealers® (ADD). The Foundation’s Chairman and CEO, Alex Popov gave this interview to Rough&Polished on the eve of the inaugural World Diamond Conference to be held in New Delhi.

01.12.2014
We fully support Zimbabwe organizing tenders at home – AWDC boss
ari_epstein_preview.jpgThe Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC) said it fully supports Zimbabwe organising local tenders and was “proud” to participate through the tender organizer it proposed – First Element. Zimbabwe’s first local diamond tender attracted about 400 buyers and 133 companies. AWDC chief executive Ari Epstein told Rough & Polished’s Mathew Nyaungwa on the sidelines of the second edition of the Zimbabwe Diamond Conference that their relationship with Zimbabwe had not been strained with the seizure of the country’s goods worth about $45 million in Belgium. Epstein also praised Zimbabwe for opting a transparent tendering system through Antwerp that brings more confidence to the local diamond industry.





Lesotho’s proposed ownership law to affect diamond firms

02.08.2012

Lesotho is set to introduce a new law that will limit foreign mining firms’ ownership in local mines to 49 percent, while the remaining 51 percent will be reserved for natives (government included).
Diamond companies to be affected by this proposed law included Gem Diamonds, which owns 70 percent of the Letseng mine, and Namakwa Diamonds, which owns the majority of the Kao mine.
Gem’s flagship Letseng diamond mine had produced 57,116 carats during the first six months of the year ended June 2012.
It said the mine also achieved an average value of $2‚133 per carat during the first half of the year compared with $3‚052 realised a year earlier.
Namakwa on the other hand realised revenues of about $4.2 million from its third sale of Kao rough diamonds in Antwerp, with achieved prices 3.4 percent higher than initial management estimates.
However, with all the positive news coming from the diamond miners in Lesotho, the country’s new Prime Minister Tom Thabane said the gems were not being mined successfully in a manner that benefits the country, hence the move to review the ownership structure.
"We also have lots of diamonds, but are not doing so well," he said.
Thabane said that the proposed law would not affect the non-mining sector as was the case in Zimbabwe under its controversial indigenisation law.
“The localisation issues mentioned are in the mining sector — other sectors are not affected,” he was quoted by Businessday as saying.
"But it is still a debate. At the moment we do not think we will follow the status quo.”

Mathew Nyaungwa, Editor in Chief of the African Bureau, Rough&Polished

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