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18.08.2014
Diamonds as a Commodity? Not a Problem - Sians Mussa
sians_mussa_preview.jpgSians Mussa is President of the Italian Diamond Bourse. He began his career as diamond dealer in 1969. The Sians family has been active in the Diamond industry for 3 generations and has offices in Milan, Rome, Valenza, Tel Aviv and New York. President Sians currently works in his Italian office together with his two sons, David and Doni. President Sians discussed with Rough&Polished the role of diamond bourses, what diamond represents in modern society, and the status of the Italian jewellery industry.

11.08.2014
What kind of impact may possible sanctions from U.S. and E.U. produce on jewelry community?
The diamond and jewelry industries have repeatedly been through various ordeals. So, should the Russian jewelers be fearful for their business in the light of recent events? And will the Russian diamond industry turn to be a winner in some way in case of sanctions on the part of Europe or America? Rough&Polished addressed these questions to the heads of diamond industry companies.

04.08.2014
We need to have close relations with bigger mining companies to get enough and timely rough supply - Navrattan Kothari
navrattan_kothari_preview.jpgA highly respected businessman held in high esteem in the Indian gems and jewellery industry, Mr. Navrattan Kothari, Chairman, KGK Group of India, has steered the conglomerate for over 50 years, with the Group now having grown into a world-class business empire. Under his guidance, the KGK Group, besides its underlying operations, funds many programs through a trust that looks into education of the underprivileged and provides healthcare facilities. Here, Mr. Kothari speaks to Rough&Polished about his initiation into the family business and his perception of the gem and jewellery business in India and all over the world as well.





Namaqualand Diamond Pits Undergo Major Rehabilitation

07.04.2009

Huge open diamond mining pits are currently being turned into oyster farms and nurseries in a multi-million-rand project that may well turn the diamond wasteland of Namaqualand, South Africa into a tourist attraction, Israelidiamond.co.il reported.
Namaqualand, where 80 years of diamond mining has left much of the coastline littered with deep holes, is currently undergoing extensive rehabilitation.
Giant diamond miner De Beers has agreed to back a plan to restore the pitted landscape. Among the projects is an oyster farm which has already been set up in a converted diamond mine pit near Kleinzee.
De Beers also recently joined forces with the Conservation Africa global environmental group to set up a 32000ha eco-zone in the middle of its diamond mine which was once the largest alluvial diamond-producing area in the world.
The project, which is called Living Edge of Africa Project (Leap), is to serve as a lifeline for the abandoned diamond mining towns of Kleinzee and Koingnaas, which morphed into ghost towns when De Beers retrenched most of its Namaqualand workforce.
Leap’s employment projects will help De Beers to comply with strict new diamond mining regulations pertaining to social labor plans and ecological conservation.
Among the planned projects are sea water greenhouses to produce food and fresh water for local consumption, aquaculture farms, producing oysters, perlemoen and mussels in tanks and water-logged mining pits, wind farms producing renewable energy and more.
The project is the joint brainchild of global conservation group Conservation International and environmental scientist Dr Peter Carrick, who heads the Namaqualand Restoration Initiative at the University of Cape Town.

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