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27.10.2014
ALROSA geologists exploring Africa for diamonds
victor_ustinov_preview.jpgViktor Ustinov is Doctor of Geological and Mineralogical Sciences and Deputy Director of the Geological Research and Exploration Unit at ALROSA in charge of the New Areas Evaluation Department (Saint Petersburg). In his interview to Rough&Polished he told about his recent business trip to Africa.

20.10.2014
AWDC regrets seizure of Zim diamonds, but says not involved in the matter
margaux_donckier_preview.jpgAbout 500 000 carats of Zimbabwean diamonds worth about $45 million that were on sale last month at the Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC) were first attached by Amari Platinum before the Belgian court reversed the seizure, pending a court ruling, which is expected anytime soon. A group of white former commercial farmers also attached the same diamonds on the basis of an International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes arbitration award against the Zimbabwean government to compensate the ex-farmers. As the legal battle rages on, the voice of AWDC had been silent and Rough&Polished’s Mathew Nyaungwa sought a comment from the centre’s spokesperson Margaux Donckier, who said they regret the seizure. However, AWDC was quick to point out that they were not involved in the matter. Donckier also commented on the recent closure of the Antwerp Diamond Bank.

13.10.2014
Interaction with clients is a key to understanding what they want and what they need
varuna_jani_preview.jpgVaruna D Jani, an award-winning jeweler ahead of her time, understands that it’s not only about investing but there is also a need of styling and personalization of jewellery. She is known more as an ‘adornologist’ than a ‘jewellery designer’. Belonging to a jeweller family, Varuna imparts knowledge and gives her recommendations on jewelry that suit individual personality. In an interview with Rough&Polished, Varuna revealed her passion for jewellery designing even as a child and her initiation into the business eventually.





Namaqualand Diamond Pits Undergo Major Rehabilitation

07.04.2009

Huge open diamond mining pits are currently being turned into oyster farms and nurseries in a multi-million-rand project that may well turn the diamond wasteland of Namaqualand, South Africa into a tourist attraction, Israelidiamond.co.il reported.
Namaqualand, where 80 years of diamond mining has left much of the coastline littered with deep holes, is currently undergoing extensive rehabilitation.
Giant diamond miner De Beers has agreed to back a plan to restore the pitted landscape. Among the projects is an oyster farm which has already been set up in a converted diamond mine pit near Kleinzee.
De Beers also recently joined forces with the Conservation Africa global environmental group to set up a 32000ha eco-zone in the middle of its diamond mine which was once the largest alluvial diamond-producing area in the world.
The project, which is called Living Edge of Africa Project (Leap), is to serve as a lifeline for the abandoned diamond mining towns of Kleinzee and Koingnaas, which morphed into ghost towns when De Beers retrenched most of its Namaqualand workforce.
Leap’s employment projects will help De Beers to comply with strict new diamond mining regulations pertaining to social labor plans and ecological conservation.
Among the planned projects are sea water greenhouses to produce food and fresh water for local consumption, aquaculture farms, producing oysters, perlemoen and mussels in tanks and water-logged mining pits, wind farms producing renewable energy and more.
The project is the joint brainchild of global conservation group Conservation International and environmental scientist Dr Peter Carrick, who heads the Namaqualand Restoration Initiative at the University of Cape Town.

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