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25.05.2015
Gemstone dealers are richer than us, Tanzania small scale miners mourn
olam_mustapha_x.jpgTanzania’s Tanga Small Scale Miners Association said it is not happy with the manner in which gemstone dealers in the East African country are profiteering from their hardwork. The association chairperson Olam Mustapha told Rough & Polished’s Mathew Nyaungwa on the sidelines of the Arusha Gem Fair in Tanzania last month that the dealers were buying stones for as low as $10 per gram and then obtain $100 per gram or even $200 per gram when the same stones are sold abroad. Below are excerpts of the interview.

18.05.2015
Demand for diamond jewelry has traditionally been and will be there in spite of crisis situations
valeri_ilyinykh_x.jpgUralskaya Yuvelirnaya Kompaniya (Ural Jewellery Company), Yekaterinburg, holds strong positions on the Russian jewellery market and specializes in the manufacture and wholesale of trendy and classic jewellery made of precious metals, precious and semi-precious gems. Along with exclusive jewellery studded with precious gems, it manufactures big lots of inexpensive and quality jewellery. It has a reputation of a reliable and responsible partner. Valery Ilyinykh, the company’s CEO, gave his answers to questions from Rough&Polished.

12.05.2015
Mira Gulati, Founder and Principal Designer of Mirari
mira_gulati_x.jpgA trained jewellery designer and gemologist from the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), Mira Gulati created the brand ‘Mirari’ to cater to India’s growing demand for luxury jewellery with a contemporary edge, as well as the international market’s craving for aesthetic of the Indian classic treasures. Even before embarking on this journey, Mira worked at several jewellery stores in California to develop her skills in sales, operations, security and dealing with clients. Armed with education and experience, Mira ventured confidently into the business of her dreams.





Namaqualand Diamond Pits Undergo Major Rehabilitation

07.04.2009

Huge open diamond mining pits are currently being turned into oyster farms and nurseries in a multi-million-rand project that may well turn the diamond wasteland of Namaqualand, South Africa into a tourist attraction, Israelidiamond.co.il reported.
Namaqualand, where 80 years of diamond mining has left much of the coastline littered with deep holes, is currently undergoing extensive rehabilitation.
Giant diamond miner De Beers has agreed to back a plan to restore the pitted landscape. Among the projects is an oyster farm which has already been set up in a converted diamond mine pit near Kleinzee.
De Beers also recently joined forces with the Conservation Africa global environmental group to set up a 32000ha eco-zone in the middle of its diamond mine which was once the largest alluvial diamond-producing area in the world.
The project, which is called Living Edge of Africa Project (Leap), is to serve as a lifeline for the abandoned diamond mining towns of Kleinzee and Koingnaas, which morphed into ghost towns when De Beers retrenched most of its Namaqualand workforce.
Leap’s employment projects will help De Beers to comply with strict new diamond mining regulations pertaining to social labor plans and ecological conservation.
Among the planned projects are sea water greenhouses to produce food and fresh water for local consumption, aquaculture farms, producing oysters, perlemoen and mussels in tanks and water-logged mining pits, wind farms producing renewable energy and more.
The project is the joint brainchild of global conservation group Conservation International and environmental scientist Dr Peter Carrick, who heads the Namaqualand Restoration Initiative at the University of Cape Town.

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