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22.12.2014
You need to keep experimenting with designs and finishing
gursimran_chaddha_1.jpgGursimran is a graduate from the University of Bradford with a bachelor degree in Accounting and Finance and is a certified gemologist from the prestigious GIA School in the U.S.A. After returning from the U.S.A., Gursimran started working with one of the biggest diamond manufacturing companies in Mumbai. After a year of gaining relevant experience, he started his own label, “Jagat Jewels” in the year 2010. After taking part in exhibitions in Ludhiana, Chandigarh and Delhi, etc., and getting overwhelming response for the label, Gursimran opened his first boutique in the heart of New Delhi in 2012. Here, in an interview with Rough&Polished, Gursimran opens up his mind as an astute businessman and sometimes as a creative designer as well...

15.12.2014
Demand for diamonds in the world is very high – AWDC
margaux_donckier_preview.jpgMargaux Donckier, spokesperson of the Antwerp World Diamond Center, told about the main trends in the diamond market in her interview to Rough&Polished.

08.12.2014
Our goal is to create a think tank, which will come up with ideas how to reach outside our closed circuit and bring people the message about diamonds, tell why they should buy them
alex_popov_x.jpgThe World Diamond Mark® Foundation (WDMF) in a non-for-profit organization founded in 2012 by the World Federation of Diamond Bourses whose goal is to increase consumer demand for diamonds and enhance the trust in them. To reach this goal, the WDMF is engaged in generic marketing programmes, raises public awareness of diamonds, educates retailers and conducts attestation of the Authorised Diamond Dealers® (ADD). The Foundation’s Chairman and CEO, Alex Popov gave this interview to Rough&Polished on the eve of the inaugural World Diamond Conference to be held in New Delhi.





Namaqualand Diamond Pits Undergo Major Rehabilitation

07.04.2009

Huge open diamond mining pits are currently being turned into oyster farms and nurseries in a multi-million-rand project that may well turn the diamond wasteland of Namaqualand, South Africa into a tourist attraction, Israelidiamond.co.il reported.
Namaqualand, where 80 years of diamond mining has left much of the coastline littered with deep holes, is currently undergoing extensive rehabilitation.
Giant diamond miner De Beers has agreed to back a plan to restore the pitted landscape. Among the projects is an oyster farm which has already been set up in a converted diamond mine pit near Kleinzee.
De Beers also recently joined forces with the Conservation Africa global environmental group to set up a 32000ha eco-zone in the middle of its diamond mine which was once the largest alluvial diamond-producing area in the world.
The project, which is called Living Edge of Africa Project (Leap), is to serve as a lifeline for the abandoned diamond mining towns of Kleinzee and Koingnaas, which morphed into ghost towns when De Beers retrenched most of its Namaqualand workforce.
Leap’s employment projects will help De Beers to comply with strict new diamond mining regulations pertaining to social labor plans and ecological conservation.
Among the planned projects are sea water greenhouses to produce food and fresh water for local consumption, aquaculture farms, producing oysters, perlemoen and mussels in tanks and water-logged mining pits, wind farms producing renewable energy and more.
The project is the joint brainchild of global conservation group Conservation International and environmental scientist Dr Peter Carrick, who heads the Namaqualand Restoration Initiative at the University of Cape Town.

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