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Pavel Vinikhin: ALROSA will make a worthy contribution to the revival of the ‘Russian Cut’ Brand

ALROSA is known as the largest diamond mining company throughout the world. However, not everyone is aware that it has its own diamond-cutting division. For a long time, the activity of DIAMONDS ALROSA remained in the shadows, only occasionally attracting...

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William Lamb: Lucara now knows best routes to market large stones

Lucara Diamond recently announced that Graff Diamonds had bought its 1,109 carat diamond Lesedi La Rona for $53 million. The stone, which is the world’s second largest diamond found since the discovery of the 3,106-carat Cullinan diamond in 1905, failed...

09 october 2017

GSI was the first in the world to begin testing of smaller size diamonds in bulk and has never looked back since - Mark Gershburg

With more than 30 years of experience in the gem lab sector under his belt, Mark Gershburg is an industry veteran widely popular in the global gem and jewelry industry. He began his career in 1980 as a grader but his professionalism, creativity, and...

02 october 2017

Gaetano Cavalieri: Over the long term, demand for diamonds is likely to grow at a steady pace

The World Jewellery Confederation (CIBJO) represents the entire jewelry industry embracing a whole variety of companies, from those mining precious metals and gems to those, which are manufacturing and selling final products. The confederation...

25 september 2017

“I am bullish on the future of the diamond business. Three reasons for this optimism... new discoveries, extending mine life and the increasing demand for diamonds”, says Martin Leake

Martin Leake is a PhD exploration geologist and Six Sigma black belt who has been involved in the rough diamond market since 2004. He worked for BHP Billiton for 22 years and recently left Grib Diamonds where he helped set up a world-class marketing...

18 september 2017

Zimbabwe says no to expanded definition of conflict diamonds ahead of KP meeting

21 april 2017
Zimbabwe said it will not support the civil society’s sponsored move to expand the definition of conflict diamonds to include issues such as human rights.
Mines minister Walter Chidhakwa told Rough & Polished that Harare engaged the South Africans on the sidelines of the African Mining Indaba last February and they also indicated their discomfort with the overhaul of the definition.
The contentious issue was expected to cause rancour at the Kimberley Process’ Intersessional meeting set for Perth, Australia early next month.
“Our argument is a very simple argument. We deal diamonds let’s do the best we can to ensure that our diamonds are clean,” said Chidhakwa.
“That is our core business, this is a UN organ there is another UN organ (that deals with human rights), before I even go there is an African Union organ responsible for human rights. If we now say human rights as they relate with diamonds must be dealt with by the Kimberley Process, (then) I don’t understand what we are trying to do.”
He also said that the UN and IMF as well as member countries had ways to deal with the issue of financial illicit.
“Why don’t we let those who have the expertise to deal with that?” he asked rhetorically.
“If we are asked for information, naturally we pass on the information to them so that they are able to better investigate the work, but to say we are going to take over the activities and responsibilities of other [agencies and institutions] as part of KP, I don’t think it’s the way to go. So we were in discussions with the South Africans, we will say no to that.”
KP chairperson Robert Owen Jones told Rough & Polished in February that the diamond watchdog would do a review this year and it won’t surprise him if a number of countries and delegates propose things like changes to the definition of conflict diamonds.
“I want to have a conversation about anything that people raise in terms of, ‘will KP work better or not if we do this?’, ultimately any decisions that we make as Kimberley Process, are decisions by consensus, so you don’t just accept any one point of view, you have to listen to everyone’s point of view and the extent to which we might change or might not change the definition will be an agreement by all of us, equally, so it’s a consensus-based organization,” he said.

Mathew Nyaungwa, Editor in Chief of the African Bureau, Rough&Polished

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