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Pavel Vinikhin: ALROSA will make a worthy contribution to the revival of the ‘Russian Cut’ Brand

ALROSA is known as the largest diamond mining company throughout the world. However, not everyone is aware that it has its own diamond-cutting division. For a long time, the activity of DIAMONDS ALROSA remained in the shadows, only occasionally attracting...

16 october 2017

William Lamb: Lucara now knows best routes to market large stones

Lucara Diamond recently announced that Graff Diamonds had bought its 1,109 carat diamond Lesedi La Rona for $53 million. The stone, which is the world’s second largest diamond found since the discovery of the 3,106-carat Cullinan diamond in 1905, failed...

09 october 2017

GSI was the first in the world to begin testing of smaller size diamonds in bulk and has never looked back since - Mark Gershburg

With more than 30 years of experience in the gem lab sector under his belt, Mark Gershburg is an industry veteran widely popular in the global gem and jewelry industry. He began his career in 1980 as a grader but his professionalism, creativity, and...

02 october 2017

Gaetano Cavalieri: Over the long term, demand for diamonds is likely to grow at a steady pace

The World Jewellery Confederation (CIBJO) represents the entire jewelry industry embracing a whole variety of companies, from those mining precious metals and gems to those, which are manufacturing and selling final products. The confederation...

25 september 2017

“I am bullish on the future of the diamond business. Three reasons for this optimism... new discoveries, extending mine life and the increasing demand for diamonds”, says Martin Leake

Martin Leake is a PhD exploration geologist and Six Sigma black belt who has been involved in the rough diamond market since 2004. He worked for BHP Billiton for 22 years and recently left Grib Diamonds where he helped set up a world-class marketing...

18 september 2017

US polished trade slows in February

20 april 2017
US polished diamond imports slid 15% to $1.49 billion in February, according to government data.
By volume, polished imports fell 18% to 635,000 carats, with the average price increasing 3% to $2,345 per carat, figures showed.
Polished exports dropped 11% to $1.75 billion. Net polished imports — the difference between inbound and outbound shipments — stood at negative $257 million, compared with negative $214 million last year, as exports once again exceeded imports in February.
During the month, exports to Hong Kong stood at $633.1 million compared with imports of $62.4 million, dragging down the net figure.
Total rough imports to the US went up 14% to $50 million, while rough exports leapt 37% to $31 million, leaving net rough imports 10% lower at $20 million.
The US net diamond account for the month, calculated as total rough and polished imports minus total exports, stood at negative $237 million compared with negative $192 million a year earlier.
During the first two months of the year, polished imports fell 14% to $3.25 billion, while polished exports decreased 13% to $2.99 billion, meaning net polished imports fell 24% to $261 million.
Rough imports, however, soared 90% to $170 million, and rough exports increased 78% to $86 million, resulting in net rough imports more than doubling to $84 million from $41 million a year ago.
The US net diamond account for January and February, meanwhile, dipped 10% to $345 million.

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