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Pavel Vinikhin: ALROSA will make a worthy contribution to the revival of the ‘Russian Cut’ Brand

ALROSA is known as the largest diamond mining company throughout the world. However, not everyone is aware that it has its own diamond-cutting division. For a long time, the activity of DIAMONDS ALROSA remained in the shadows, only occasionally attracting...

16 october 2017

William Lamb: Lucara now knows best routes to market large stones

Lucara Diamond recently announced that Graff Diamonds had bought its 1,109 carat diamond Lesedi La Rona for $53 million. The stone, which is the world’s second largest diamond found since the discovery of the 3,106-carat Cullinan diamond in 1905, failed...

09 october 2017

GSI was the first in the world to begin testing of smaller size diamonds in bulk and has never looked back since - Mark Gershburg

With more than 30 years of experience in the gem lab sector under his belt, Mark Gershburg is an industry veteran widely popular in the global gem and jewelry industry. He began his career in 1980 as a grader but his professionalism, creativity, and...

02 october 2017

Gaetano Cavalieri: Over the long term, demand for diamonds is likely to grow at a steady pace

The World Jewellery Confederation (CIBJO) represents the entire jewelry industry embracing a whole variety of companies, from those mining precious metals and gems to those, which are manufacturing and selling final products. The confederation...

25 september 2017

“I am bullish on the future of the diamond business. Three reasons for this optimism... new discoveries, extending mine life and the increasing demand for diamonds”, says Martin Leake

Martin Leake is a PhD exploration geologist and Six Sigma black belt who has been involved in the rough diamond market since 2004. He worked for BHP Billiton for 22 years and recently left Grib Diamonds where he helped set up a world-class marketing...

18 september 2017

EU draft law on minerals from conflict areas approved

17 march 2017

The European Parliament approved last Thursday a EU draft law, which provides for mandatory due diligence evaluation of companies trading in certain minerals imported from conflict zones or high risk areas.
Starting from January 1, 2021, the new rules will require all EU-based companies, with the exception of the smallest importers, to evaluate the compliance of their suppliers delivering such products, as tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold, which, in particular, are used to manufacture computers, mobile phones and jewelry. The evaluation will be mandatory for importers from "the conflict zones and high risk areas".
According to the statement released by the European Commission, the rules will cover up to 95% of imports as of 1 January 2021. In the meantime, the Commission and Member States will work to make sure that the necessary structures are in place to ensure EU-wide implementation.
Together with the new rules, the EU will be putting in place accompanying measures to support small and medium-sized importers, and development aid to ensure the Regulation is effective and has a positive impact on the ground, the EC statement said. The EU has also been reaching out to governments in Africa, Asia and beyond to encourage them to source responsibly and eliminate alternative markets for conflict minerals.
"I'm very glad we now have an ambitious, workable solution to eliminate conflict minerals from supply chains," said Commissioner for Trade Cecilia Malmström after the vote. "Trade needs to take account of our values and the Parliament's decision today is a great example of how this can be achieved. The new rules will ensure that minerals used by European industries are sourced responsibly, in a way that does not harm populations in mining regions and does not fuel war. The new Regulation will reduce the hardship and human rights abuses that have for too long accompanied this trade. Transparent and responsible supply chains mean revenues will not go into the hands of rebel groups, but to investment in schools and hospitals, supporting a well-governed state underpinned by the rule of law. It means improving people's lives, from conflict and terror to opportunity and hope. It means encouraging the economic growth that helps the poorest regions grow sustainably."
The new regulation is yet to be approved by the EU Council. It will come into force after publication in the EU Official journal.

Alex Shishlo, Editor of the Rough&Polished European Bureau in Brussels

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