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ALROSA sells large diamonds at the auction in Israel for $13.7M

ALROSA has summed up the results of international auction for the sale of special size rough diamonds over 10.8 carats at the International Diamond Week in Israel (IDWI).

16 february 2018

Botswana Diamonds starts scoping study to find potential commerciality at Thorny River

Botswana Diamonds said that it has commenced a scoping study to determine the potential commerciality of the Thorny River Diamond Project, in South Africa.

16 february 2018

Zambia's President fires mining minister

Zambian president Edgar Lungu has fired his mines and minerals minister Christopher Yaluma who last week told delegates at a mining indaba in Cape Town that very little exploration for industrial minerals had been conducted in the country.

16 february 2018

China's jewellery companies woo independent women in marketing blitz

Facing slowing global demand for diamond jewelry, diamond companies from around the world are reshaping marketing campaigns to tap a growing pool of independent female spenders in China, the world's second-largest economy, as per a Reuter's report...

16 february 2018

Zim wants Botswana’s help to process Marange diamonds – report

Zimbabwe is expected to enlist the help of Botswana to start processing its diamonds in the neighbouring country in a bid to boost the value of Marange stones, according to a state-owned newspaper.

16 february 2018

Protecting the Image of Diamonds

18 may 2017
(janosconsultants.blogspot.ru) - Late last year there were two events in New York about the diamond business.  I'd call them bookends to the business, in that they address two real concerns - the image of diamonds, and the growing presence of man-made diamonds (MMDs). The first was the presentation by DPA (Diamond Producers Association) on the new advertising and promotional program for natural diamonds, "Rare is Real."  This was, finally, an attempt by the leading mining companies to rebuild the natural diamond image in the minds of consumers.  Two ads were shown (you have probably seen them by now) and I liked them both, if that means anything, while other people were very dubious.  Both were appeals to the millennials, with different approaches, though both skated around the classic themes of commitment and happiness.  As I think further about it, both reflect lifestyles that most Trump supporters, and even many Clinton supporters, probably disapprove of.  In introducing "real life" stories, filled with doubt and adventure, the DPA seems to be trying to equate real life with real diamonds. One question here is whether the DPA at this point is deliberately not reaching for Boomers and Trumpers, and plain old-fashioned thinkers.  It seems so, though I was told a whole range of ads have been prepared targeting other demographics.  Another question is money.  The DPA reportedly has put in some $15 million, to get this rolling, but getting money from the trade over an extended period is a real question.  It will take a lot more than that to reinvigorate the image of diamonds, I'd say at least ten times as much.  In the New America, I suspect, people will be keeping their wallets closed.  Money goes further in these days of social networking, but will this new message carry? Here we are, months later, and I sense no impact from the DPA initiative.  And when the subject is raised at various industry get-togethers, I see eyes glaze over.  People involved in the program made a point of saying this is not a short term blast, and that it will take time, maybe a couple of years, before the effort is full-blown and showing results.  OK, we are patient, and we will wait and see.  But frankly, I can't seem get very energized by this program.

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